« Posts tagged canyonlands national park

Cat Man

Cat Man

Let’s go back to a pictograph I took a photo of last weekend in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. This figure is probably one of the most unique out of all of the figures at the Flying Carpet Panel. The interior designs on the torso are very interesting, and while this particular anthropomorph is probably not a cat, the head on this sure reminds me of one. It looks like there might even be a snake over it’s head, or maybe that’s just an arc?

Grabens Panelramic

Grabens Panelramic

Here’s something a little different- my first panaramic, or should I say panelramic photo that I have posted on the blog. I knew before visiting this panel that it was going to be a tough one to photograph, and it was. There are some very unique anthropomorphs found in this Barrier Canyon Style panel with interesting interior designs. This is my first attempt at bringing out the details in this photo. I may try a few more techniques in Photoshop to try and bring it out more when I have a chance. It’s an awesome panel that you can see had a lot of detail at one time, but unfortunately it’s just not in that good of shape anymore. Make sure to click on the photo to view a larger size on Flickr so you can get a better look at all the details here.

Peekaboo Panel

Peekaboo Panel

I posted a black and white version of this photo on Tuesday, but I wanted to go ahead and post a color version that shows more of this very unique panel found near Peekaboo Spring in Salt Creek Canyon. They are hard to see in this particular photo, but the white Anasazi pictographs are actually painted over a few very faint Barrier Canyon Style pictographs at this site.

Flying Carpet

Flying Carpet

I visited a number of new rock art panels this past weekend including the spectacular Flying Carpet Panel. This is another unique Barrier Canyon Style panel that contains a large rectangular figure with short arms that does kind of resemble a flying carpet. This is just a portion of the large panel of pictographs found here.

Peekaboo Shields B&W

Peekaboo Shields B&W

Here’s another pictograph panel I visited over the holiday weekend. I’ve been waiting for the Salt Creek Road to open up for a while, but the weather just has not cooperated, so I decided to finally hike to Peekaboo. I thought that this photo of the Anasazi shield-like figures looked good in black & white. If you look very closely, you can see the very faint Barrier Canyon Style figures that these were painted over.

Feet & Hands

Feet & Hands

I just got home a little while ago from spending the holiday weekend in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. Of course, my main goal was to visit and find some rock art sites in the area. I managed to find a few new panels but there were still a couple that I didn’t find on this trip. The photo above is a portion of a very well known panel near SOB Hill in Devils Lane. It should be familiar to anyone who has driven the Elephant Hill Trail and made the side trip over to the Joint Trail.

Holy Ghost & Friends

Holy Ghost & Friends

Can you beleive that I have had this blog up for a few months now and I still haven’t posted a photo from the Great Gallery or of the Holy Ghost figure? The pictographs in Horseshoe Canyon along Barrier Creek are some of the most well-known in the world! Well, I’m about to fix that right now by posting this photo of the Holy Ghost with a couple of other anthropomorphic figures surrounding it. This is an outstanding panel and there is so much to see here. I have plans to head back there again this fall, and am looking forward to it!

Hands

Hands

Two different styles of handprints in Canyonlands National Park contrast nicely against each other. This is just a small section of a much larger pictograph panel that contains many Barrier Canyon Style elements and at least one Fremont styled anthropomorph.

Horseshoe Gallery

Horseshoe Gallery

Horseshoe Canyon, previously known as Barrier Canyon, is a very special place. It’s also the location where Barrier Canyon Style rock art derived it’s name from. There are many pictograph panels located in this canyon including the famous Great Gallery. From the main trailhead you will pass the Horseshoe Gallery on your way to the Great Gallery. While this panel might not be as large or as detailed as Great Gallery, I find it very striking. I think it might be because many of the figures seem to be purposely painted on the lighter horizontal stripe of the canyon wall, which helps to frame them.

Five Faces

Five Faces

The Five Faces are an outstanding pictograph panel tucked away in a remote canyon within Canyonlands National Park. This panel represents one of the ‘Faces’ motifs which consist primarily of polychrome anthropomorphs that have flat-topped or bucket-shaped heads on top of broad shouldered torsos. Below the panel, there are many ‘metate’ grooves on the large stones. I have visited this panel a couple of times and it still fascinates me. Now I just need to make the time to visit the other panels in the area that represent the ‘Faces’ motif.

The Harvest Scene

The Harvest Scene

For the last couple of years I have made a list of goals that I wanted to accomplish throughout the year which has helped motivate me to get things done. Near the top of my list for 2011 was to finally get to The Maze District of Canyonlands National Park so that I could visit The Harvest Scene pictographs. I was able to secure a campsite permit in April and spent four days and three nights in the Land of Standing Rocks with a couple good friends. Our first full day was spent hiking to The Harvest Scene and it was an incredible experience. This panel is pretty faded and very hard to see in direct sunlight, but fortunately while we were there a few clouds blocked the sun for us and I was able to admire and photograph this impressive panel. The photo above shows only part of the panel, but it’s the part where the name ‘Harvest Scene’ derives. I find the larger anthropomorphic figure on the left with white stripes to be very unique, but my favorite figure is the large one on the right with the outstretched arm. If you look closely at the middle finger on it’s hand, it appears there is ricegrass growing from the tip. On either side of the ricegrass this are small zoomorphs; the left one appears to be a bird and the right one a rabbit. I really enjoyed visiting this site and am planning on hopefully returning again sometime next year and hiking to it from The Maze Overlook.

You can click on this photo and view a larger size on Flickr if you want to see the finer details better.